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A few years ago, I had the unfortunate experience of a car accident. I broke up to 12 bones in my right arm, left hand and right ankle—spending three months in a nursing home to recover. In only my early 30s, it wasn’t in my radar of places I would like to be. As I started to heal, I got involved in a senior fitness class. (I mean, why not?) The seniors that were involved were lifting one to two-pound dumbbells, but at least they were keeping their muscles active. It’s so important to keep those muscles moving and here’s how to do it.

First, get out in your neighborhood and go walking. Or, join a neighborhood gym and walk around their track. Purchase a Fitbit that is going to track your steps, calories burned and your heart rate. This is really going to get you up and moving. If you want to feel challenged, you may add a one or two-pound dumbbell to each hand—but don’t do this right away. Spend a week or two working up to your walking routine. For instance, maybe you go around the block the first day. Maybe you go two blocks on day two and three blocks on day three. Before you know it, you’re walking up to a mile each day and burning those calories.

Working out with weights is also another great option. If you choose to do this, I recommend getting a trainer at a gym. Be completely honest about your limits. If you can handle only 10 pounds, tell them. They’re there to serve you with your fitness goals in mind. If they’re a good trainer, they are not going to push you beyond what you can do. They should, however, sit down with you and work out a fitness plan. For instance, perhaps on Tuesdays you and the trainer work the weight machines. Then, on Thursday, maybe you work on aqua exercise or aerobics.

Speaking of aqua exercise, you should consider swimming as a strength training exercise. This is one type of exercise that works every area of your body. Your core is going to get firm and tight, your arms and legs are going to get toned. Say good-bye to your love-handles and back fat. If you keep this up for a few months, you’re going to be in really great shape. All your friends at Bingo are going to start envying you!

It’s vital that seniors take part in strength training. When we’re young, we don’t have to worry much about muscle mass and our bones, but as we get older, both of these start to change. Our muscles start to get weaker and our bodies, if they don’t receive enough calcium, can become brittle. This makes it easier for them to break for no reason at all. When we strength-train, even with a couple of dumbbells, this is helping to re-gain the muscle mass that we have lost. Take it back and you will always feel strong!

Strength Training For Seniors or Elderly : Exercises For The Elderly Video

Originally posted 2016-02-12 16:20:08.

Jennifer Olson
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Jennifer Olson is a professional freelance writer. She is a published author on Amazon as well as a blogger. Meanwhile, Jennifer is a 5-star rated professional proofreader, editor and article writer--offering her writing services on Fiverr.com.

Tagged on: aqua exercise    dumbbells    Fitbit    fitness    seniors    strength training    swimming    walking    weights

3 thoughts on “Why Strength Training Is Important For Seniors

  • 23 February 2016 at 12:28 PM
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    I was not sure what strength training for an elderly guy was all about, but this all made sense. I am admittedly soft. I am way past soft I suppose, so a bit of strength training is likely a good idea and way overdue. Thanks for lighting the fire under my butt that is going to get me to my local gym on seniors’ night

    Reply
  • 15 February 2016 at 12:54 PM
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    As I sit here reading this I am in pain from a pulled muscle in my side, towards my back more. I lifted my computer bag and slug it over my shoulder. Weak old muscles could not handle what was not a heavy bag. As soon as the pain is gone… hoping it will be soon… I am going to the gym. They have a seniors session every other day which I obviously need to attend.

    Reply
  • 12 February 2016 at 8:17 PM
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    This is preaching to the choir in my case. I am actually sitting up in bed, propped up by pillows because of pulled muscles on the right side of my back. I have not do a workout in ages and now I am suffering for it. I only picked up a computer back and put it over my shoulder and I have been laid up for two days already. Muscles left to go soft are an invitation to injury. Once I am back up and active I will be working out to the best of my ability so this does not happen again, or at least if it does the damage will be minimized.

    Reply

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